Common Myths of CBT

 
 
  • Myth of simplicity 

    • In fact CBT is based on Psychological Science as well as Complexity Science.

  • Power of positive thinking

    • In fact CBT is interested in adaptive Content of as well as an adaptive Relationship to thoughts, feelings, and behavior patterns.

  • Singular goal of clear thinking

    • In fact the goals of CBT includes, thoughts, emotions and behaviors as well as context.  What might appear to be simply clear thinking usually depends on many variables, such as physical health, inflation, hormones, neurotransmitters, exercise, nutrition and sleep. Another way to describe this is to say the methods of CBT are top (brain processing) down AS WELL as bottom (including the myriad of complex physiological systems) up.

  • Lack of interest in the past

    • In fact attachment styles, adversive childhood events, and early beliefs, play a major role in conceptualizing the problem.

  • Neglect of transference

    • In fact various dimensions of the therapeutic relationship are key.

  • Avoidance of pharmacotherapy

    • In fact there is data that suggests medication has a role in treatment planning.

  • Band-Aid Cure

    • In fact the goal is for the client to learn how to be their own therapist.

  • Non-dynamic model

    • In fact CBT emphasizes that the human condition is not static nor a unidimensional existence.  The human condition is rather extremely dynamic and complex.

  • Acquisition of “gimmicks”

    • In fact CBT is based on empirically based methods.

  • Ignores implicate memory and somatic memory

    • In fact, implicit and explicit memories, whether somatic or cognitive, are often uncovered as we search for core beliefs and underlying schemas.